Business Startup

News Roundup: Business is an Adventure; Robotic Technology; Electronics Ban

The Future of Robotic Technology

President Trump’s pick for Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao will likely lead a historic transformation in the FAA and NHTSA. Self-driving cars and drone technology are rapidly advancing, and the regulations implemented in the next four years will influence that advancement. Robotic technology may (or may not) be the future of how we conduct business.

Seattle Paid Family and Medical Leave

The City of Seattle and Washington State are both currently considering policies requiring businesses to offer paid family and medical leave. Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez just revealed a plan for the Seattle policy.

Virgin Atlantic’s “Business is an Adventure” Series

Tuesday, March 28, Virgin Atlantic is hosting the next installment of their “Business is an Adventure” live event series in...

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Business Startup

What Kind of Startup Investor is Right for Your Company?

While not all startups have to raise money to scale, most startups will need some investor money to grow. When it’s time to fundraise, there are many potential sources of funding for your startup. Today’s blog post will discuss different kinds of startup investor and explore other ways startups find the financial support they need to be successful.

What is an Angel Investor?

Angel investors are usually individuals, or groups of individuals, who invest their own money into early stage companies. “Seed funding” from angel investors is usually one of the first sources of financing a startup company will pursue (generally after raising initial funds from the founders and their friends and family). This seed funding is generally used to support the...

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Business Startup

Four Important Considerations When Launching a Startup

Today’s post highlights some of the key considerations that founders of any startup company should have in mind as they begin the process of turning an idea into a business. The action items we discuss in this post are simple things to address early on in the company and can have immediate and lasting positive impacts for the company and its founders.

Forming a Corporation or LLC to Limit Personal Liability

One of the first steps the initial partners should take is to form a limited liability entity (either corporation or LLC in most cases) in order to limit the owners’ personal liability. Forming the entity will also open the door to discussing the initial ownership percentages, vesting provisions, and management rights....

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Corporate Finance & Securities

Employee Equity Explained: Stock Options

Today, we are continuing our series on Employee Equity Explained by discussing stock options specifically.

Stock options are contracts that allow an employee to buy shares (this is called “exercising” the option) at a fixed price. Options are different than receiving stock because an option is exactly as it sounds; it’s an option to buy stock upon certain conditions being met, such as vesting (discussed below).

There are two standard types of stock options: Incentive Stock Options (“ISOs”) and Nonstatutory Stock Options (“NSOs”).

ISOs provide the recipient with certain tax benefits but they can only be provided to employees of the company, not independent contractors or non-employee board members. Additionally, only $100,000 in ISOs can be exercisable in any given year. NSOs on...

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Corporate Finance & Securities

New Law Makes Resale of Private Stock Easier

Congress recently passed a new securities law exemption (Section 4(a)(7) of the Securities Act of 1933) that eases the limitations and restrictions surrounding the resale of private stock.  Prior to the new law, there were several regulatory hurdles that made the resale of private stock in a company difficult. As we’ve highlighted in prior posts, securities regulations require any sale of stock to be registered with the SEC (a time-consuming, expensive process), unless the sale is “exempt”—which means that the sale falls within one of the exemptions provided for in the securities regulations. (Check out one of our prior posts on securities exemptions and Rule 144 for more background on the regulations specifically surrounding selling stock in private companies as they applied...

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Corporate Finance & Securities

What is a Cap Table?

A cap table (or capitalization table) is a spreadsheet listing all of your company’s securities (stock, options, etc.) and who owns those securities. Cap tables provide a basic look into the “total pie” and each shareholder and option holder’s piece of that pie (basically who owns what). More detailed cap tables will include formulas that allow the company to model future transactions. 

There’s no one-size-fits-all way to structure your cap table. Some provide only a general summary of the breakdown of ownership in a company, while others include extensive details about the individual holder, the type of securities held, issue dates, ownership percentages on a fully diluted basis, and other granular details.

When’s the Right Time to Build a Cap Table?

It’s relatively...

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