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Today’s post highlights important considerations when transferring LLC ownership interests, including transfer restrictions and the right of first refusal.

When buying or selling an ownership interest in an LLC, it’s important to consider several key issues that may affect the transaction. Today’s post highlights some of these important considerations when transferring LLC ownership interests.

Are there any restrictions on your ability to transfer the interest?

Most operating agreements will provide provisions that discuss the process for transferring a member’s interest. Many operating agreements require the member to provide notice of the transfer and often include a right of first refusal, which right allows the company to match the terms of a sale of a member’s interest (more on this topic below). And some operating agreements do not allow for a member to transfer his or her interest without unanimous member consent.

If…

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Restrictions

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This post discusses Section 4(a)(7) of the Securities Act of 1933 and its impact in potentially making the resale of private stock easier.

Congress recently passed a new securities law exemption (Section 4(a)(7) of the Securities Act of 1933) that eases the limitations and restrictions surrounding the resale of private stock.  Prior to the new law, there were several regulatory hurdles that made the resale of private stock in a company difficult. As we’ve highlighted in prior posts, securities regulations require any sale of stock to be registered with the SEC (a time-consuming, expensive process), unless the sale is “exempt”—which means that the sale falls within one of the exemptions provided for in the securities regulations. (Check out one of our prior posts on securities exemptions and Rule 144 for more background on the regulations specifically surrounding selling stock in private companies as they applied…

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New Law Reduces Hurdles to Resale of Private Stock

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In today's blog post, we discuss the basics of how to complete an entity conversion in Washington state.

In a previous post, we discussed how the entity conversion bill passed by the Washington State Legislature in 2014 allowed companies to complete a conversion (instead of going through a merger) to change a company’s entity structure. You can use a conversion to change your entity structure to a different form (i.e. from an LLC to a corporation) or change your domicile to a different state. We continue the discussion about conversion in this post by going into more detail about the steps to complete a conversion.

Eligible Entities

Washington law allows conversions between domestic limited liability companies (LLCs), corporations, and limited partnerships. Washington law also allows these domestic entities to convert to foreign entities (a foreign entity is an entity incorporated in…

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Entity Conversion

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This post in the purchase and sale of a business series discusses employees and employment matters to consider when purchasing (or selling) a business.

One of the most important parts of a business is the people doing the day-to-day work. When looking into purchasing a business, it’s important to identify and understand the needs and rights of key employees, review existing employment agreements, and consider any employment related successor liability issues that may come up as part of the transaction. We’re continuing our series on the Purchase and Sale of a Business by highlighting important employee related considerations when purchasing a business.

Identifying (and Locking Up) Key Employees

Does the business you’re purchasing rely heavily on a few key employees? Especially for service-based businesses that rely heavily on relationships, these key employees can be one of the most valuable assets for the business. Making sure you…

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Locking up Key Employees

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This post discusses five key securities-related issues for merger and acquisition transactions.

In business acquisitions, and especially in business acquisitions structured as stock purchases, there are a number of securities issues you’ll want to be on the lookout for. For the purposes of this post, you can think of a security as the stock or other equity interest in a company like an option or warrant. (You can check out this post for a more detailed discussion of what a security is.) Below I’ve listed 5 key securities-related due diligence issues for you to consider when purchasing a business.

We’ll start with the two key issues that are important for acquisitions of both stock and assets; we’ll finish with three key issues that primarily affect stock acquisitions:

Issues for acquisitions of either stock or assets

Two issues are of…

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M&A Securities Issues

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In today's blog post, we discuss how you can dissolve your Washington business entity.

If you’ve decided to move on from the business you’ve started and it doesn’t make sense to sell it, you’ll likely want to dissolve your Washington business. To do so, you’ll need to consider the following steps:

Dissolving a Corporation 

To voluntarily dissolve a Washington corporation, generally the corporation’s board of directors will propose dissolution and submit the proposal for a vote by the shareholders. Two-thirds of the authorized shareholders then must approve the proposed dissolution. The initial directors, incorporators, or board of directors may also dissolve the corporation by majority vote under certain circumstances, like when no shares have been issued.

Following the vote to dissolve, the corporation must file Articles of Dissolution with the Secretary of State to notify the state of the corporation’s intention to…

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Office building door

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Today’s post highlights three simple questions buyers should consider to protect intellectual property rights when purchasing a business .

When purchasing a business, buyers often overlook one important part of the purchase: formally transferring the seller’s intellectual property rights to the buyer. The most common IP rights include copyrights, trademarks, patents, and trade secrets. Today’s post highlights three simple questions buyers should ask before purchasing a business.

Can you and do you want to transfer the business’ trademarks?

In most purchases, trademarks will be easily assignable from the seller to the buyer. However, in some situations even if the trademarks are assignable, you may not want to acquire them. For example, if the business’ logo infringes on trademark rights of another business, then you wouldn’t want to transfer ownership of the logo and risk being held liable for trademark infringement once…

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Non-disclosure agreement

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Once you nail down the terms of the business acquisition in a letter of intent, it's time to begin drafting a business purchase and sale agreement.

Once you’ve nailed down the terms of the acquisition (usually in a letter of intent), it is time to begin putting the terms into a formal agreement usually referred to as a business “purchase and sale agreement.” This agreement will spell out the seller’s and buyer’s rights and responsibilities with respect to the transaction. We’re continuing our series on the Purchase and Sale of a Business by highlighting some of the major considerations when putting together the business purchase and sale agreement for your acquisition.

Structure of the Sale: What assets and liabilities are included?

As we discussed in a prior post in this Purchase and Sale of a Business series, you’ll need to sort out whether the sale will be an…

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Business Purchase and Sale -Stock sale v. asset sale

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We’re continuing our series on the purchase and sale of a business with a look into intellectual property considerations when purchasing a business.

We’re continuing our series on the purchase and sale of a business with a look into intellectual property considerations when purchasing a business. Intellectual property is a large part of many companies’ value. Failing to sort out potential restrictions on the use and further development of a company’s IP may leave the buyer with a significantly less valuable company than it anticipated. Below are some of the major intellectual property considerations to have in mind when you purchase a business:

Ownership of and Right to Use the IP

The first hurdle, and perhaps the most important consideration when reviewing a target company’s intellectual property rights, is confirming that it owns, or at least has a valid license for, all of the key…

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Intellectual Property hurdles

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In this news roundup we discuss the FCC's "broadband" definition update (more interesting than it sounds), startup fundraising, securities laws, and more...

FCC Updates Broadband Definition

The FCC voted to raise the minimum thresholds needed to meet the definition of broadband. Internet service providers now must provide download speeds of at least 25Mbs and upload speeds of at least 3Mbps to call their services “broadband.” The previous standard was 4Mbps for download speed and 1Mbps for upload speed.

While this sounds pretty innocuous, the new definition may have some interesting consequences.

A little background: In 1996 Congress mandated that the FCC report on whether broadband is being deployed to all Americans in a reasonable and timely fashion, and Congress defined broadband as high-quality capability that allows users to originate and receive high-quality voice, data, graphics, and video.

The first and most obvious consequence of the…

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Internet