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In today's blog post, we'll discuss the non-waivable provisions of the Washington Limited Liability Company Act in more detail.

Significant changes to the Washington Limited Liability Company Act went into effect on January 1 of this year. As I wrote in a previous blog post on the Washington Limited Liability Company Act changes, the changes were intended to make the law easier to understand and give members more flexibility in how they want to manage and operate an LLC. Under the old act, the non-waivable provisions were scattered throughout the act. Under the new act, the non-waivable provisions are all listed in one place for convenience— in Section 25.15.018 of the RCWs. In this blog post, we’ll discuss the non-waivable provisions in more detail.

The LLC Act allows members of an LLC flexibility in outlining through the LLC Operating Agreement how…

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Washington Limited Liability Act

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In today's blog post, we discuss the basics of how to complete an entity conversion in Washington state.

In a previous post, we discussed how the entity conversion bill passed by the Washington State Legislature in 2014 allowed companies to complete a conversion (instead of going through a merger) to change a company’s entity structure. You can use a conversion to change your entity structure to a different form (i.e. from an LLC to a corporation) or change your domicile to a different state. We continue the discussion about conversion in this post by going into more detail about the steps to complete a conversion.

Eligible Entities

Washington law allows conversions between domestic limited liability companies (LLCs), corporations, and limited partnerships. Washington law also allows these domestic entities to convert to foreign entities (a foreign entity is an entity incorporated in…

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Entity Conversion

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A cap table (or capitalization table) is a spreadsheet listing all of your company’s securities (stock, options, etc.) and who owns those securities.

A cap table (or capitalization table) is a spreadsheet listing all of your company’s securities (stock, options, etc.) and who owns those securities. Cap tables provide a basic look into the “total pie” and each shareholder and option holder’s piece of that pie (basically who owns what). More detailed cap tables will include formulas that allow the company to model future transactions. 

There’s no one-size-fits-all way to structure your cap table. Some provide only a general summary of the breakdown of ownership in a company, while others include extensive details about the individual holder, the type of securities held, issue dates, ownership percentages on a fully diluted basis, and other granular details.

When’s the Right Time to Build a Cap Table?

It’s relatively…

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Cap Table Pie

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Today we will discuss the frequency and type, notice requirements, and voting protocol of shareholder meetings in Washington State.

As a shareholder in a corporation it is important to know your rights. One of those rights is the right to attend shareholder meetings. Today we will discuss the frequency and type, notice requirements, and voting protocol of shareholder meetings in Washington State.

Washington corporations are governed by the Washington Business Corporation Act, which is codified in RCW 23B. Shareholder meetings are specifically outlined in RCW 23B.07.

Frequency and Type of Shareholder Meeting

The two types of meetings that shareholders attend are “annual” and “special” meetings. RCW 23B.07.010 lays out the requirements for annual shareholder meetings and is summarized as follows:

1) Corporations must hold an annual shareholder meeting;

2) Meetings can be held in or out of state but if the place is not…

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Shareholder Meetings

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In today's blog post, we discuss the recent changes made to the Washington Limited Liability Company Act.

Earlier this year, the Washington state legislature unanimously passed and the governor signed legislation making changes to the Washington Limited Liability Company Act—the most sweeping changes to Washington LLC law in recent history.

The Washington State Bar Association requested that the state make changes to the Washington Limited Liability Company Act. The bar association’s goal was to make the law easier to understand and more flexible by modifying provisions that the association described as creating pitfalls and unnecessary problems. The Washington state Senate and House eventually passed legislation making those changes, and Governor Inslee signed the law on May 7, 2015. The new changes will go into effect on January 1, 2016.

Some of the major changes to the Washington Limited Liability…

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Limited Liability Company Act

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Today's post highlights some important distinctions between corporations and LLCs to help you choose the right entity structure for your company.

It’s important to understand the significant (and sometimes subtle) differences between the various choices when determining the right entity structure for your new venture. Today’s post details some important distinctions between corporations and LLCs.

The Distinction Between State Entities vs. Federal Tax Elections 

For state law purposes, there are two primary entities that the choice of entity generally comes down to: corporations and LLCs. Corporations and LLCs both offer limited liability to owners of the company. This means that (absent extraordinary circumstances) if the business is sued, only business assets are at risk and the ownerss personal assets will be shielded from the company’s liabilities.

For federal tax purposes, there are three primary tax classifications that most companies are organized under: C corporations, S corporations, and…

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Liability shield

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Today’s post highlights some of the key considerations to have in mind when finding startup advisors for your company.

Startup advisors can be an extremely valuable resource for early-stage companies. Typically advisors bring startup experience, a large network of entrepreneurs, investors and other types of advisors, and sound business advice for growing your company. In today’s post, we’ve highlighted some of the key considerations to have in mind when considering hiring advisors for your startup:

Are They the Right Fit?

Perhaps the most important consideration is finding a person that understands your business and goals and finding someone that has industry experience and contacts that you can leverage strategically for the benefit of your business. They should also be someone you trust and that you know will give you reliable advice. It also helps if you get along with and enjoy…

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Startup advisors

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In this blog post, we'll discuss how to convert a traditional corporation into a social purpose corporation.

Yes, an existing Washington business entity can convert into a social purpose corporation (“SPC”). In this blog post, we’ll discuss how an existing traditional corporation can become a social purpose corporation.

To convert a corporation into an SPC, the company needs to take a few steps. First, the board of directors has to recommend the corporate action to the shareholders. The action must pass by at least two-thirds of the votes of the voting group entitled to vote on the corporate action. Further, the action must pass by two-thirds of all other shares voting as separate voting groups. Essentially, the SPC conversion statute controls over any existing arrangement in the corporation’s governing documents. So the corporate action to convert to an…

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social purpose corporation

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To protect against founders taking their equity and running, startups often have a repurchase option to buy back shares from the departing founder.

Most founders are concerned about making sure each of the co-founders are invested in the company. Founders often ask about protecting against a co-founder leaving the company, taking his or her equity, and sharing in the potential future upside value of the startup without continuing to work for that right. To protect against this, startups often have a “repurchase option” to buy back shares from the departing founder.

When Can the Company Exercise the Repurchase Option?

While terms can vary, the shares issued to the founders are often subject to a vesting schedule that requires the founder fulfill certain obligations—e.g. to stay with the company a period of time, achieve certain milestones, or any other creative requirements the founders agree on— in…

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Repurchase Option

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If your business' primary objective is to promote social values, you should consider forming a social purpose corporation ("SPC").

Prior to the emergence of the Washington social purpose corporation (“SPC”) and similar corporate forms in other states, entrepreneurs who wanted to build for-profit companies with specific social values faced a dilemma. They could create a business structured to focus primarily on profits, a corporation. Alternatively, they could create a business focusing on a social mission, a non-profit corporation. But the non-profit corporation could not operate for profit. So if they wanted to be profitable, they couldn’t as effectively capitalize on the socially responsible reputation that non-profits achieved, even if it was an important part of their business identity. However, SPCs can now bridge that gap. In today’s blog post we discuss how a SPC allows a company to more…

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Social purpose corporation