Practical advice. Flat rates. Plain language.


by

We discuss the importance of keeping good business records and how to create good business records, including meeting minutes.

In today’s post, we’ll discuss why it’s important to maintain good business records, what records you should preserve, and how to produce meeting minutes.

What Are “Good Business Records”?

A “good business record” is clear documentation that captures important information at the time the information is created or exchanged (and a “generally better than nothing business record” is one created later to document something that happened in the past). Examples of important information that a business should document are agreements made between business partners, decisions made by the company, and information collected from customers. One of the simplest forms of a good business record is “minutes” created at or directly after a meeting documenting the discussion and decisions from the meeting.

Why Should You Maintain…

Read More

Keeping good business records

by

This post discusses attorney-client privilege and what you need to know about the concept to protect yourself and your business in a future legal dispute.

What is the attorney-client privilege generally?

The attorney-client privilege is the legal right that protects communications between a person and her attorney from compelled disclosure in a legal action. Attorney-client privilege is most often invoked when a person is asked to provide details of communications in a court proceeding or regulatory hearing, and it is codified in Washington as a rule of evidence. In a hearing, if a party otherwise entitled to the information asks for details or copies of communications and the communications are subject to attorney-client privilege, then the person being asked to disclose the information can withhold certain parts of those communications by claiming the attorney-client privilege. 

Why do we have the attorney-client privilege?

The attorney-client privilege exists because it…

Read More

Attorney-client privilege quiet please

by

We continue the Understanding Your Commercial Lease series by discussing how commercial leases treat taxes and what tenants can do to improve tax treatment.

Taxes are another important consideration when working towards understanding your commercial lease. The tax provisions of your lease will detail what taxes are required to be paid by the tenant and what taxes are required to be paid by the landlord. The tax provisions will also detail how and when all taxes must be paid. To understand the true costs of your lease, you must understand what taxes you are required to pay and who takes on the risk that tax rates rise or additional taxes are levied.

What taxes will you be required to pay under your commercial lease?

The taxes you are required to pay are generally described in the definition of “Taxes” in the lease. How the definition will be written…

Read More

commercial-lease-taxes-2

by

In today's blog post, we'll discuss the non-waivable provisions of the Washington Limited Liability Company Act in more detail.

Significant changes to the Washington Limited Liability Company Act went into effect on January 1 of this year. As I wrote in a previous blog post on the Washington Limited Liability Company Act changes, the changes were intended to make the law easier to understand and give members more flexibility in how they want to manage and operate an LLC. Under the old act, the non-waivable provisions were scattered throughout the act. Under the new act, the non-waivable provisions are all listed in one place for convenience— in Section 25.15.018 of the RCWs. In this blog post, we’ll discuss the non-waivable provisions in more detail.

The LLC Act allows members of an LLC flexibility in outlining through the LLC Operating Agreement how…

Read More


by

Issuing employee equity in a startup, or any business, is a great way to compensate and incentivize employees.

Issuing equity to employees in a startup, or any business, is a great way to compensate and incentivize employees. However, employers and employees are often confused about the various types of equity compensation available and the pros and cons of each type of employee equity. In this series of blog posts on employee equity, we will continue our discussion of employee equity compensation plans by detailing the various types of equity that employers can grant and lay out the reasons for choosing one over the other.

When someone receives “equity” in a company, this means that they are receiving stock or future rights to stock in the company. By owning stock in a company, that person will then become a shareholder,…

Read More

Employee Equity

by

In today's blog post, we discuss the basics of how to complete an entity conversion in Washington state.

In a previous post, we discussed how the entity conversion bill passed by the Washington State Legislature in 2014 allowed companies to complete a conversion (instead of going through a merger) to change a company’s entity structure. You can use a conversion to change your entity structure to a different form (i.e. from an LLC to a corporation) or change your domicile to a different state. We continue the discussion about conversion in this post by going into more detail about the steps to complete a conversion.

Eligible Entities

Washington law allows conversions between domestic limited liability companies (LLCs), corporations, and limited partnerships. Washington law also allows these domestic entities to convert to foreign entities (a foreign entity is an entity incorporated in…

Read More

Entity Conversion

by

A cap table (or capitalization table) is a spreadsheet listing all of your company’s securities (stock, options, etc.) and who owns those securities.

A cap table (or capitalization table) is a spreadsheet listing all of your company’s securities (stock, options, etc.) and who owns those securities. Cap tables provide a basic look into the “total pie” and each shareholder and option holder’s piece of that pie (basically who owns what). More detailed cap tables will include formulas that allow the company to model future transactions. 

There’s no one-size-fits-all way to structure your cap table. Some provide only a general summary of the breakdown of ownership in a company, while others include extensive details about the individual holder, the type of securities held, issue dates, ownership percentages on a fully diluted basis, and other granular details.

When’s the Right Time to Build a Cap Table?

It’s relatively…

Read More

Cap Table Pie

by

Today we will discuss the frequency and type, notice requirements, and voting protocol of shareholder meetings in Washington State.

As a shareholder in a corporation it is important to know your rights. One of those rights is the right to attend shareholder meetings. Today we will discuss the frequency and type, notice requirements, and voting protocol of shareholder meetings in Washington State.

Washington corporations are governed by the Washington Business Corporation Act, which is codified in RCW 23B. Shareholder meetings are specifically outlined in RCW 23B.07.

Frequency and Type of Shareholder Meeting

The two types of meetings that shareholders attend are “annual” and “special” meetings. RCW 23B.07.010 lays out the requirements for annual shareholder meetings and is summarized as follows:

1) Corporations must hold an annual shareholder meeting;

2) Meetings can be held in or out of state but if the place is not…

Read More

Shareholder Meetings

by

In today’s blog post, we review employer policies regarding parental leave and discuss what businesses can expect in the future.

We’ve been reading the business news surrounding companies increasing the parental leave they offer their employees. In today’s blog post, we take a more in depth review of the trend locally, discuss what businesses can expect in the future, and remind employers to understand applicable law before developing their parental leave policy.

Parental Leave in the News

Washington tech giants Microsoft, Amazon, and Zillow have recently announced plans to increase their parental leave. Microsoft now offers 12 weeks of fully paid parental benefits to all new mothers and fathers. Amazon also introduced a revamped parental leave policy. Amazon will offer birth mothers up to 20 weeks of leave. Amazon has also introduced a shared leave program; employees whose partners do not receive parental leave…

Read More


by

In today's blog post, we discuss how you can dissolve your Washington business entity.

If you’ve decided to move on from the business you’ve started and it doesn’t make sense to sell it, you’ll likely want to dissolve your Washington business. To do so, you’ll need to consider the following steps:

Dissolving a Corporation 

To voluntarily dissolve a Washington corporation, generally the corporation’s board of directors will propose dissolution and submit the proposal for a vote by the shareholders. Two-thirds of the authorized shareholders then must approve the proposed dissolution. The initial directors, incorporators, or board of directors may also dissolve the corporation by majority vote under certain circumstances, like when no shares have been issued.

Following the vote to dissolve, the corporation must file Articles of Dissolution with the Secretary of State to notify the state of the corporation’s intention to…

Read More