Intellectual Property

White House Opposition Signals the End for SOPA; Anti-Piracy Legislation Continues to Brew

We wrote a post a few weeks ago discussing the reasons why we oppose SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act). Here’s a quick update of where the bill stands currently.

Late last week, opponents of SOPA felt a sigh of relief. The reason? Perhaps the most powerful ally the Internet community could ask for, President Barack Obama, announced his Administration will not support SOPA, effectively putting a halt to passage of the bill. The White House announcement came in response to widespread opposition for SOPA, in particular, a We the People Petition signed by nearly 52,000 opponents of SOPA. The message behind the petition read “the more freely information flows; the stronger that society becomes,” a quote from President Obama.

“We we will not support...

Read More

Intellectual Property

Congress & the Internet: A Discussion on SOPA, and Why iVLG Opposes SOPA

The house and senate are set to vote on legislation that could have profound effects on online commerce and the Internet in general. These bills seek to protect the intellectual property rights of US businesses and individuals, but opponents of the bill worry that these bills are too broad, are likely to be ineffective for their intended purposes, and are likely to have important negative unintended consequences. Given the current state of the legislation, for reasons we’ve detailed below, we side with those opposing the legislation.

These controversial bills may be voted on as soon as next month. The Senate version is called the “Protect Intellectual Property Act” (PIPA), and the House version is called the “Stop Online Piracy Act” (SOPA)....

Read More

Intellectual Property

News Roundup 12/8 – 12/14: IPO’s, Piracy, Censorship, Google Apps, and Tech Funding

Antipiracy Bill AKA Censorship Bill May Pass This Week The House of Representatives is expected to vote as early as this week on the Stop Online Piracy Act. The House bill, and similar legislation that is likely to pass in the Senate (the “Protect IP Act“), would allow the Justice Department to seek court orders requiring U.S. Internet-service providers, search engines, payment processors and ad networks to block or stop doing business with foreign websites linked to online piracy. It would also make it a felony to stream copyright-protected materials, leading a Harvard Law Professor believing that the law could put Justin Bieber in prison for three years due to videos he has uploaded to YouTube. Businesses in the entertainment industry...

Read More

Intellectual Property

Crash Course on Intellectual Property Law

Intellectual property law is broken down into four main areas: trademark, copyright, trade secret, and patent.

This post provides a basic explanation of each area of intellectual property, and simple steps you can take to protect your intellectual property:

Trademarks

Trademarks and service marks are protected under state and federal law. Logos, company names, product names, and slogans are some of the common marks that are protected under the Lanham Act (the federal statute governing trademarks). There are two primary categories of trademarks: plain-text marks (or word marks) and design marks. An example of a plain-text mark is “Nike”, and an example of a design mark is the Nike Swoosh.

 

What rights do trademark holders have?

A trademark holder has the right to exclude others from...

Read More

Intellectual Property

End User License Agreements

As part of our continuing series on basics of technology contracts, today we’ll take a look at end user license agreements.

What is an end user license agreement? An end user license agreement is an agreement between a software provider and a software user. The provider allows use of the software, but retains ownership of the software.

What do end user license agreements do? An end user license agreement should clearly explain the rights granted to the end user. Specifically, the agreement should address the permissible uses and the ability to reproduce the software.

For example, the provider may wish to limit use by subsidiaries or parent companies. Another approach is to limit the number of designated users (often called “seats”). And if the recipient...

Read More

146 N Canal Street, Suite 350   |   team@invigorlaw.com