Mergers & Acquisitions

Business Purchase and Sale: Considering Employees

One of the most important parts of a business is the people doing the day-to-day work. When looking into purchasing a business, it’s important to identify and understand the needs and rights of key employees, review existing employment agreements, and consider any employment related successor liability issues that may come up as part of the transaction. We’re continuing our series on the Purchase and Sale of a Business by highlighting important employee related considerations when purchasing a business.

Identifying (and Locking Up) Key Employees

Does the business you’re purchasing rely heavily on a few key employees? Especially for service-based businesses that rely heavily on relationships, these key employees can be one of the most valuable assets for the business. Making sure you...

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Commercial Real Estate

Understanding Your Commercial Lease: Insurance, Subrogation, and Indemnification

In this latest post in the Understanding Your Commercial Lease series we’re going to discuss insurance, subrogation, and indemnification. (Subrogation will often be grouped under the insurance provision in your lease.) The insurance, subrogation, and indemnification provisions of your commercial lease allocate risk between the landlord and the tenant (and each of their insurers).

Insurance

In nearly every commercial lease you will find robust insurance requirements for the tenant that are mandated by the landlord. The tenant is going to be required to pay for insurance that will include general liability insurance, property damage insurance for the tenant’s property, business interruption insurance, automobile liability insurance, worker’s compensation insurance, and then often an umbrella policy. The landlord will often ask the tenant for insurance the...

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Corporate Finance & Securities

What is a Cap Table?

A cap table (or capitalization table) is a spreadsheet listing all of your company’s securities (stock, options, etc.) and who owns those securities. Cap tables provide a basic look into the “total pie” and each shareholder and option holder’s piece of that pie (basically who owns what). More detailed cap tables will include formulas that allow the company to model future transactions. 

There’s no one-size-fits-all way to structure your cap table. Some provide only a general summary of the breakdown of ownership in a company, while others include extensive details about the individual holder, the type of securities held, issue dates, ownership percentages on a fully diluted basis, and other granular details.

When’s the Right Time to Build a Cap Table?

It’s relatively...

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Business Startup

Shareholder Meetings in Washington State

As a shareholder in a corporation it is important to know your rights. One of those rights is the right to attend shareholder meetings. Today we will discuss the frequency and type, notice requirements, and voting protocol of shareholder meetings in Washington State.

Washington corporations are governed by the Washington Business Corporation Act, which is codified in RCW 23B. Shareholder meetings are specifically outlined in RCW 23B.07.

Frequency and Type of Shareholder Meeting

The two types of meetings that shareholders attend are “annual” and “special” meetings. RCW 23B.07.010 lays out the requirements for annual shareholder meetings and is summarized as follows:

1) Corporations must hold an annual shareholder meeting;

2) Meetings can be held in or out of state but if the place is not...

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Mergers & Acquisitions

Five Key Securities Issues in Due Diligence of M&A Deals

In business acquisitions, and especially in business acquisitions structured as stock purchases, there are a number of securities issues you’ll want to be on the lookout for. For the purposes of this post, you can think of a security as the stock or other equity interest in a company like an option or warrant. (You can check out this post for a more detailed discussion of what a security is.) Below I’ve listed 5 key securities-related due diligence issues for you to consider when purchasing a business.

We’ll start with the two key issues that are important for acquisitions of both stock and assets; we’ll finish with three key issues that primarily affect stock acquisitions:

Issues for acquisitions of either stock or assets

Two issues are of...

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Business Startup

Employer Trends in Parental Leave Policies

We’ve been reading the business news surrounding companies increasing the parental leave they offer their employees. In today’s blog post, we take a more in depth review of the trend locally, discuss what businesses can expect in the future, and remind employers to understand applicable law before developing their parental leave policy.

Parental Leave in the News

Washington tech giants Microsoft, Amazon, and Zillow have recently announced plans to increase their parental leave. Microsoft now offers 12 weeks of fully paid parental benefits to all new mothers and fathers. Amazon also introduced a revamped parental leave policy. Amazon will offer birth mothers up to 20 weeks of leave. Amazon has also introduced a shared leave program; employees whose partners do not receive parental leave...

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Commercial Real Estate

Understanding Your Commercial Lease: Damages, Destruction, and Business Interruption

This latest post in the Understanding Your Commercial Lease series discusses damages, destruction, and business interruption. The damages and destruction provisions of your commercial lease will detail who (between the tenant and landlord) will be responsible for damages to (or destruction of) the premises, the building, and the entire real estate complex. Business interruption is often closely associated with damages and destruction as those events often interrupt the tenant’s business, but business interruption can also come about in the context of repairs, maintenance, and utility-related issues. The language in your commercial lease that discusses “smaller” damages is often included in the repairs section of the lease, and the destruction clause (sometimes called the “casualty” clause) will generally cover major damages.

Damage

Damages...

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Corporate Finance & Securities

Hedge Fund Accredited Investors

We are continuing our series on understanding hedge funds; we will be discussing the definition of “accredited investors” and why it is important to your hedge fund.

As a brief primer, you should know that all hedge funds considering a securities offering must comply with federal and state securities laws. The Securities Act of 1933 and 1934 (“Acts”) were put in place to protect investors after the market crashed in 1929, and prior to this point in time, securities were chiefly governed by state law (which still applies in may situations). The two main objectives of the Acts were: 1) to require that investors receive significant (or “material”) information concerning securities being offered for public sale; and 2) to prohibit deceit, misrepresentations, and other fraud in...

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Business Startup

Checklist for Forming a Washington Corporation

A few weeks back, we provided a checklist for forming an LLC. In today’s post we’ve highlighted the key issues you’ll want to consider when forming a Washington corporation.

Check the Business Name. As we mentioned with LLCs, you’ll want to make sure the name you want for your corporation isn’t already registered with the Secretary of State (which you can check here). For corporations, you’ll need to include some reference to the fact that the company is a corporation, such as “Inc.” “Corp.” or “Co.” Articles of Incorporation. The “Articles of Incorporation” is the document you file with the Secretary of State in order to form your corporation. This document must include (at the bare minimum) the name of the corporation, the...

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Business Startup

How to Dissolve Your Washington Business

If you’ve decided to move on from the business you’ve started and it doesn’t make sense to sell it, you’ll likely want to dissolve your Washington business. To do so, you’ll need to consider the following steps:

Dissolving a Corporation 

To voluntarily dissolve a Washington corporation, generally the corporation’s board of directors will propose dissolution and submit the proposal for a vote by the shareholders. Two-thirds of the authorized shareholders then must approve the proposed dissolution. The initial directors, incorporators, or board of directors may also dissolve the corporation by majority vote under certain circumstances, like when no shares have been issued.

Following the vote to dissolve, the corporation must file Articles of Dissolution with the Secretary of State to notify the state of the corporation’s intention to...

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