The Canal Street Blog

Business-focused legal discussion

News Roundup: Business is an Adventure; Robotic Technology; Electronics Ban

A weekly events and news roundup for Seattle area businesses; featuring robotic technology, Virgin Atlantic's latest installment, and the electronics ban.

  Serena Dickerson The Future of Robotic Technology

President Trump’s pick for Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao will likely lead a historic transformation in the FAA and NHTSA. Self-driving cars and drone technology are rapidly advancing, and the regulations implemented in the next four years will influence that advancement. Robotic technology may (or may not) be the future of how we conduct business.

Seattle Paid Family and Medical Leave

The City of Seattle and Washington State are both currently considering policies requiring businesses to offer paid family and medical leave. Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez just revealed a plan for the Seattle policy.

Virgin Atlantic’s “Business is an Adventure” Series

Tuesday, March 28, Virgin Atlantic is hosting the next installment of their “Business is an Adventure” live event series in...

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Founder Math: Comparing Convertible Notes & Priced Equity

See what your cap table might look like if you do capped convertible notes, uncapped convertible notes, or a priced equity deal.

  Kyle Hulten In this post we have an embedded excel sheet that founders can use to compare what their cap table might look like down the road if they use a capped convertible note, uncapped convertible note, or a priced equity deal in their seed round....

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What Kind of Startup Investor is Right for Your Company?

Today’s blog post will discuss different kinds of startup investor and explore other ways startups find the financial support they need to be successful.

  Anne Pfeifle

While not all startups have to raise money to scale, most startups will need some investor money to grow. When it’s time to fundraise, there are many potential sources of funding for your startup. Today’s blog post will discuss different kinds of startup investor and explore other ways startups find the financial support they need to be successful.

What is an Angel Investor?

Angel investors are usually individuals, or groups of individuals, who invest their own money into early stage companies. “Seed funding” from angel investors is usually one of the first sources of financing a startup company will pursue (generally after raising initial funds from the founders and their friends and family). This seed funding is generally used to support the...

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Keeping Good Business Records

We discuss the importance of keeping good business records and how to create good business records, including meeting minutes.

  Charlene Angeles

In today’s post, we’ll discuss why it’s important to maintain good business records, what records you should preserve, and how to produce meeting minutes.

What Are “Good Business Records”?

A “good business record” is clear documentation that captures important information at the time the information is created or exchanged (and a “generally better than nothing business record” is one created later to document something that happened in the past). Examples of important information that a business should document are agreements made between business partners, decisions made by the company, and information collected from customers. One of the simplest forms of a good business record is “minutes” created at or directly after a meeting documenting the discussion and decisions from the meeting.

Why Should You Maintain...

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HALOS ACT: Will Congress Give the Green Light to Investment Pitches at Startup Demo Days?

In this post we discuss a bill in Congress (HALOS Act) that would make it easier for startups to raise funds at pitch events.

  Brandon Mahrt

Presentations made at startup demo days on college campuses and at accelerator pitch events routinely mention the details of a company’s effort to raise capital through the private sale of securities. This practice, however, raises concerns over whether these presentations amount to a ‘general solicitation’ for a company’s securities under Regulation D of the Securities Act. The definition of a general solicitation could include any advertisement, article, or other communication, including any meeting where the attendees were invited by a general advertisement that present the opportunity to participate in a company’s securities offering. If an early stage company makes a general solicitation, then it may be precluded from using certain valuable exemptions from registering their security offering with the SEC.

Companies...

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